Thursday, May 19, 2016

What goes wrong when people only view history from one perspective?

When people only view history from one perspective they are unable to understand what the people on the other side of the situation are feeling. In The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, written by Sherman Alexie, it points out how most people do not understand how awful Native Americans were treated; and still are. In the book, 14 year old, Arnold, is in school and his teacher frequently will come to class in his pajamas because he doesn't care enough about the Native American kids he is teaching. To add to that, the textbooks they are using at the school are so old that when Arnold opens his, it has his mothers name written in it from when she was in school. At one point in the book, Arnold's teacher, Mr. P, tells him, “If you stay on the rez, they’re going to kill you. I’m going to kill you. We’re all going to kill you” (Alexie 43). He is trying to tell Arnold that if he stays on the reservation then he will always be poor and barely surviving, but if he leaves then he may have a chance to make something of himself. Everyone seems to overlook how horribly Native Americans have been treated and now they are left with practically nothing.

Sunday, May 1, 2016

What happens to good people put in evil places?

When civilized people are put in evil places there are many things that could happen. They could be strong and stay civilized or they could end up cracking under the pressure and giving into the evil. What happens during these circumstances depends on the kind of person and who they are with. One example of people giving in to the evil is the Stamford Prison experiment. The experiment was supposed to show what would happen when good people are put in bad places, but nobody ever thought it could end so badly. The Guards acted inhumanly toward the prisoners by abusing them. The prisoners started to act back and attack the guards. Then, the guards would hurt the prisoners and put then in solitary confinement. The prisoners started to feel like they were actually in a real prison and when asked what there name was they would say there number instead of there name. The way the guards were acting is very similar to how Jack and his tribe were acting in "Lord of the Flies."

Friday, April 15, 2016

Mob Mentality in "Lord of the Flies"

There are many examples of mob mentality in "Lord of the Flies," by William Golding, but there are no examples of good mob mentality. All of the mob like behaviors shone by the boys in "Lord of the Flies" are bad and usually end poorly. One example of this is when the boys are hunting for pigs on the island. They don't want the excitement they felt to end so they start acting like a mob and loose there self control. The boys start celabrating by yelling "'Kill the pig! Cut his throat! Kill the pig! Bash him in!'" (Golding, 114). They pretend that Robert is the pig. They say it is just a game but they end up hurting him. This kind of mob mentality is bad because they are hurting each other. Another example is when they kill the mother pig with newborn piglets. Then, they are so excited from the kill that they cut off the pigs head and put it on a stick. The behaviors that they are showing are things that they would normally not do if they were back home in England. They new environment and not having anyone to tell them to stop is making the boys act differently and more savage.

Friday, April 8, 2016

"Lord of the Flies" Chapter 6 Figurative Language Quote


 "A sliver of moon rose over the horizon, hardly large enough to make a path of light even when it sat right down on the water" (Golding, 95).

 http://bestanimations.com/Earth&Space/Moon/moon-animation1.gif                  http://www.falsaria.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/falsaria1410533941lunasonreia.jpg

William Golding uses a lot of figurative language in chapter 6 of his book, "Lord of the Flies". In the quote I picked, Golding uses imagery to depict how the sky looks. One way he does this to by saying that there is only a sliver of a moon to imply that it is very dark out. He also uses personification when he said the moon sat down on the water. He is saying that the moon is not high in the sky but instead is just above the horizon. He uses figurative language here to make a clear and interesting image of the night setting.
The images I chose show how the crescent moon gives off a very little amount of light. They also show how close to the horizon the moon was.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Is it posible to teach empathy?

Empathy is a quality that most people need to have. It allows people to understand and feel what other people are feeling. In an article by BBC Magazine, called 'Can you teach people to have empathy,' it talks about how it would be possible to teach people to be empathetic. I agree with the article, I think it would be possible to teach empathy. "98% of people have the ability to empathize wired into their brains" (BBC Magazine, 1). Not all people will act on this ability to empathize all the time.
Most people would walk by a mother struggling with her kids without a second thought. Our modern day society makes it easy for us to forget the feelings of others, but we can still learn to empathize with others. If you spent a whole day thinking about everyone who is connected to your daily routine, then you would notice that there are so many people who we take for granted, but without them our lives would be completely different. It is possible for people to learn empathy.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

In the media, there have been many examples of T.V. shows and movies that have characters with mental illnesses in them. Some are portrayed well and some are not. In an article called "Mental Illness Sans Cliches," by Susan Brink, she talks about how the media portrays people with mental illnesses. In her article, Brink is trying to say that the media is getting better about how it portrays mental illnesses, but there are still times when they portray mental illnesses horribly wrong. "'Since 2000, the industry has been improving. But just when we think there's been a breakthrough, something bizarre or awful gets put on the air,' says Bob Corolla, director of media relations for the National Alliance on Mental Illness" (Brink, 2). Even though the media is getting better, you can't always trust it to have accurate portrayals of mental illnesses.